Plant-Based Diet

Choose More Plants

Move over, meat. Or at least scoot over a little and make some room—our veggie friends are eyeing center plate. That’s because more and more people are recognizing the benefits of meals based on fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains. Plus, consuming more plants can be easier on the earth, too.


Nothing says you have to go vegan, or even vegetarian. Burger lovers and bean lovers—we love ‘em all! But the benefits of a plant-based diet are well documented. And the good news is that improving your diet can be as easy as slipping in an extra serving or two of fruit, veggies, nuts or soy every day.

Silk® can be a great place to begin. Try delicious soymilk, almondmilk or cashewmilk instead of your usual dairy milk in cereal, or pack a tempting Dairy-Free Yogurt Alternative for lunch. It could be the start of a deliciously smart new habit.

Soy Benefits

When it comes to taking care of your body, soy is more than just another plant-based food. For starters, soy is a complete protein, which means it has an adequate proportion of all of the essential amino acids. Plus it’s been recognized for its potential role in supporting heart health.

In fact, as part of a healthy diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, 25 grams of soy protein per day may help reduce the risk of heart disease. (A serving of Silk Vanilla soymilk has 6.25 grams of soy protein.)


Nothing against our friends the cow, the chicken and the pig. But getting them from the field to the dinner table can take a lot more resources than eating plants, which naturally live lower on the food chain. So when you work a few more plant-based foods into your routine, you’re doing something smart for your body and the planet.

Did you know that producing one half-gallon of milk requires four times more water than producing one half-gallon of Silk soymilk, almondmilk or coconutmilk?1 And that’s just one example of how plant-based diets can help protect and conserve the Earth’s limited resources.

1 Based on a 2010 water footprint assessment conducted by Silk using the Water Footprint Network methodology and the average annual consumption of Silk by U.S. households.